Last edited by Goltitaur
Monday, May 18, 2020 | History

5 edition of Irish shrines & reliquaries of the Middle Ages found in the catalog.

Irish shrines & reliquaries of the Middle Ages

by Raghnall OМЃ Floinn

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Published by Country House, in association with the National Museum of Ireland in Dublin .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Ireland.,
  • Ireland
    • Subjects:
    • Christian shrines -- Ireland.,
    • Reliquaries -- Ireland.,
    • Christian art and symbolism -- Ireland -- Medieval, 500-1500.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 24.

      Other titlesIrish shrines and reliquaries of the Middle Ages.
      StatementRaghnall Ó Floinn.
      ContributionsNational Museum of Ireland.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsNB1793.I73 O2 1994
      The Physical Object
      Pagination46 p. :
      Number of Pages46
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1208817M
      ISBN 100946172404
      LC Control Number94204287
      OCLC/WorldCa31227857

      sources and demonstrates the multitude of relics and shrines in circulation in early medieval Ireland. 2. Raghnall O Floinn, Irish Shrines and Reliquaries of the Middle Ages (Dublin: Town and Country House, ); Colum Hourihane, Gothic Art in Ireland Enduring Vitality (Lon don and New Haven: Yale, ). 3. Christianity as practised in the late Middle Ages demanded physical rituals. These rituals encompassed great public displays, such as processions around town walls and through churches, led by clergy dressed in ceremonial garb; smaller public displays, such as priests’ performances of Mass; and actions by the laity, including small private rituals involving a votary with his book and perhaps.

      The bulk of work in precious metals that survives from the Middle Ages is ecclesiastical: golden altars, like that of S. Ambrogio in Milan (c. ), where scenes from the life of Christ and St. Ambrose are framed by panels of cloisonné enamel and filigree (openwork); and reliquaries and book covers in gold and silver, set with gems and. - Explore sowersteam's board "altars, shrines, and reliquaries", followed by people on Pinterest. See more ideas about Religious art, Altar and Sacred art pins.

      The Cult of Saints and The Rise of Pilgrimage An Investment in Pilgrimage Art. Although the concept of Christian pilgrimage to a sacred site was almost as old as Christianity itself, pilgrimage as a social phenomenon in medieval Europe increased dramatically during the tenth and eleventh centuries as more people visited traditional shrines where saints' relics had long been venerated. Indeed, in the Middle Ages, the book becomes an attribute of God. Every stage in the creation of a medieval book required intensive labor, sometimes involving the collaboration of entire workshops. Parchment for the pages had to be made from the dried hides of animals, cut to size and sewn into quires; inks had to be mixed, pens prepared, and.


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Irish shrines & reliquaries of the Middle Ages by Raghnall OМЃ Floinn Download PDF EPUB FB2

Irish shrines & reliquaries of the Middle Ages (Irish Treasures) Paperback – January 1, by Raghnall Ó Floinn (Author)Author: Raghnall Ó Floinn. Irish shrines & reliquaries of the Middle Ages. Dublin: Country House, in association with the National Museum of Ireland, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Raghnall Ó Floinn; National Museum of Ireland.

Irish shrines & reliquaries of the Middle Ages by Raghnall Ó Floinn Published by Country House, in association with the National Museum of Ireland in : Buy Irish Shrines and Reliquaries of the Middle Ages (Irish treasures) by O'Floinn, Raghnall (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Raghnall O'Floinn. Reliquaries such as the Domnach Airgid book shrine, the Shrine of St Culan's Bell, and St Manchßn's Shrine were portable, and their meaning was constituted in movement.

The patrons of reliquaries, usually prominent secular rulers or Church leaders, employed performance, ritual, and narrative (both visual and textual) to reinforce the efficacy of relics and consequently, to authorize political relationships.

The shrines are extant for the Book of Dimma (TCD; fig. 1) and the Book of Mulling (National Museum of Ireland), while the damage visible on Codex Usserianus Primus implies that it was also kept in a metal box for some time (see more on this HERE).

Fig. 1 The Misach, late 11th century andNational Museum of Ireland © National Museum of Ireland. The exhibition features most of the surviving medieval Irish shrines and reliquaries, most of which are associated with Irish saints.

These include a number of book shrines: the Domhnach Airgid, the Cathach, the Miosach and the Stowe Missal; and bell shrines: St Senan’s Bell and the Corp Naomh, as well as the shrine of St Patrick’s Tooth and the Mias Tighearnáin.

The practice of enclosing books in sealed book-shrines or cumdachs seems to have been common in Ireland in the Middle Ages: eight such Irish  reliquaries dating from the early 9th century to have survived to this day, though most  have been subjected to later refurbishments.

1 The Library of Trinity College Dublin, in addition to being the home of the Book of Dimma (TCD MS 59), also. Medieval reliquaries frequently assume the form of caskets (chasses) (a,b; –87,–), but complex containers in the form of parts of the body, usually mimicking the relics they enshrined, are one of the most remarkable art forms created in the Middle Ages for the precious remains of saints.

In the Middle Ages, people would go in search of relics and bring them back to be displayed in their churches. These relics would be stored in all different types of shrines, or reliquaries, within the church.

They would often be elaborate vessels of gold encrusted in jewels. The Irish relics and reliquaries are seen by historians and archaeologists as unique records of traditional metalworking, and can provide invaluable information about former kings and.

Sacral Geographies explores the role of reliquaries such as the Domnach Airgid book shrine, the Shrine of St Brigid’s Shoe, and St Manchan’s Shrine in the construction of spatial identity in early Ireland.

While chapters on tomb-shaped shrines and crozier-relics appraise connections between Continental and Irish forms, and the effect of. Ó’Floinn, R. Irish Shrines and Reliquaries of the Middle Ages, Country House, Dublin Tagged church, Cork, Early Medieval, Shrine, St.

Lachtin's Arm Post navigation. Thomas Cahill is an academic best known for his "Hinges of History" series. I read the four previous books in the series and written reviews about two of them: "How the Irish Saved Civilization", "The Gifts of the Jews".

The fifth book in the series is about the "Mysteries of the Middle Ages". Cahill takes a different approach in this by: 3. Ivory was widely used in the Middle Ages for reliquaries; its pure white color an indication of the holy status of its contents.

These objects constituted a major form of artistic production across Europe and Byzantium throughout the Middle Ages. The shrine is inscribed in Latin 'Wood of the True Cross'; it dates from the 11th century and the reliquary from The shrine is believed to have been a gift to the Cathedral at Waterford from Muircheartach O'Brien, king of Munster and great grandson of Brian Boru, and may have been a companion of the relic in Holy Cross Abbey, Co.

Tipperary. The space of the 'holy body' therefore functioned as a foundation for the social geographies of early Geographies explores the role of reliquaries such as the Domnach Airgid book shrine, the Shrine of St Brigid's Shoe, and St Manchan's Shrine in the construction of spatial identity in early Ireland.

This is despite the author’s own admission that many of the most popular sites of holy pilgrimage in Ireland, such as Croagh Patrick, are not (and I insert my own words of caution in this statement) ‘[known to have been] associated with shrines or reliquaries either by extant objects or in textual traditions’ (p.

A (dare I suggest. Say hello to Saint Mundita: 2nd century Christian martyr and patron saint of single women. Given our 21st Century sensibilities, this relic in Munich’s St. Peter’s Church clearly fits into our “Weird and Wonderful Series” definitely a bit on the weird side. But in the Middle Ages this relic would have been a perfectly natural (or should I say supernatural) sight in any cathedral.

Reliquaries for a piece of the cloth of Virgin Mary (left) and of Saint Anne, her mother, made in multicoloured stones by Ottavio Miseroni after on order for the very pious Empress Anna, wife of Emperor Matthias I, brother and successor of Rudolf II pins.

Insular and Anglo-Saxon Art and Thought in the Early Medieval Period Edited by Colum Hourihane. Covering the arts of Ireland and England with some incursions onto mainland Europe, where the same stylistic influences are found, the terms “Insular” and “Anglo-Saxon” are two of the most problematic in medieval art history.In the later Middle Ages religious books were created for the private devotions of the laity.

They were based on readers used by the monks. These books contained prayers to be read at specific times during the day, they were popularly known as ____.

a. Books of Devotions b. Books of Sacramentaries c. Books of Hours d. Books of Benedictionals.The forms of reliquaries - from small enameled boxes to elaborately decorated shrines in the shapes of body parts - created identities and histories around holy objects.

In medieval Ireland, it was often associative rather than corporeal relics that were enshrined: bells, books, staffs, and even pieces of clothing worn by holy men and women.